Dadri as a teaching moment: What would you do in class?

Last week, a man was lynched to death because rumours had it he had eaten beef. The police did not investigate who had attached him but whether it was indeed beef he ate. Outraged commentary has followed as well as soul-searching on the direction India is taking.

http://www.ndtv.com/blog/basehara-village-carries-no-shame-1225235?site=full
http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/the-party-and-its-poison/

Having just blogged about teaching moments for peace education, I asked some of our friends how they would talk about this horrible incident in their classes or to their children. No one has responded so far. But I just read this article by Natasha Badhwar and decided to share it here.

http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/VFqKNnKMcIyOGZudWdoSwJ/Can-Alizas-India-survive.html

What do you think? Would you bring this up in your classroom? What would you say, how would you lead or facilitate the discussion? Do share with us! Leave your answers in the comment space or send us an email to peace.prajnya@gmail.com. If you have written something, share it with us.

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2 thoughts on “Dadri as a teaching moment: What would you do in class?

  1. I guess I just find it hard to know how to make this a teaching moment because it just seems so self-evident that what happened is wrong. Taking a life is wrong, judging people by what they eat is wrong, imposing culinary regimes of any sort should not be the business of the state…the list is endless. I would imagine people know this. But I guess if they did, then what happened in Dadri wouldn’t have happened.

    Sudha

    1. I think even in a classroom where everyone shared these values, this would make for a teaching moment. The surprise that people could think in this way. Trying to understand that–also to discuss what would be a constructive response in that situation. Even listening to people express their reactions. And for smaller children, it must be even more bewildering–on the one hand, we teach acceptance and on the other hand, they see this on TV or in the papers. I don’t know how I would address the moment in class but I think I would try and at least create an opening to see if students wanted to talk about it. I don’t know. I truly am soliciting ideas and methods.

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